News

The Brisbane Club

Meet a Member – Melanie Farris

Melanie Farris
Principal, New Cavendish Management Consulting

melanie farris

What prompted you to become a Member?

I was looking to join a members club for both community and connection. A colleague introduced me to the Club, and I was taken by the feel, facilities, specialist groups, and the high frequency of quality events on offer.

What do you enjoy most about the Club?

It is a great environment. The calendar is full of interesting events with great speakers, and I am looking forward to both attending and hosting new and interesting functions. I also look forward to more time enjoying the wonderful food and the excellent Cellar!

Are you a regular attendee of any Special Interest Groups or what would entice you to join one?

As well as arts, music, and maybe (on a good day) marathon-related groups, I recently read about a member keen to start a leadership group which sounds great. I also love photography, and hope to submit an entry to this year’s competition.

What does your business do?

New Cavendish, which is named after the New Cavendish Club, a private members’ club in London created as a meeting place for women who had served with Voluntary Aid Detachments during the First World War, provides company secretary, governance, CFO and investor relations services to SME private and listed companies. Service and commitment to the common good combined with “discretion, firmness and tact” were guiding principles of the New Cavendish Club, which we feel sit very well with our own guiding values.

What does your position entail?

I lead the company secretary, governance and IR services for New Cavendish and its’clients, which range in sector from biotechnology to NFP to agriculture. On a day-to-day basis I work to help align the needs of boards, management and investors, and have also recently led a ‘whole of organisation governance workshop for the Governance Institute of Australia.

What are your passions outside of work?

My precious children lead the list here. Saying that, opportunity and safety for all children is a passion, as is economic and social equity. On a lighter note, music – from classical through to house – has always been a passion, and yoga is a newly found joy.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Member : Anthony Goodwin

Meet
a
Member

Melanie
Farris

Melanie Farris
Principal, New Cavendish Management Consulting

melanie farris

What prompted you to become a Member?

I was looking to join a members club for both community and connection. A colleague introduced me to the Club, and I was taken by the feel, facilities, specialist groups, and the high frequency of quality events on offer.

What do you enjoy most about the Club?

It is a great environment. The calendar is full of interesting events with great speakers, and I am looking forward to both attending and hosting new and interesting functions. I also look forward to more time enjoying the wonderful food and the excellent Cellar!

Are you a regular attendee of any Special Interest Groups or what would entice you to join one?

As well as arts, music, and maybe (on a good day) marathon-related groups, I recently read about a member keen to start a leadership group which sounds great. I also love photography, and hope to submit an entry to this year’s competition.

What does your business do?

New Cavendish, which is named after the New Cavendish Club, a private members’ club in London created as a meeting place for women who had served with Voluntary Aid Detachments during the First World War, provides company secretary, governance, CFO and investor relations services to SME private and listed companies. Service and commitment to the common good combined with “discretion, firmness and tact” were guiding principles of the New Cavendish Club, which we feel sit very well with our own guiding values.

What does your position entail?

I lead the company secretary, governance and IR services for New Cavendish and its’clients, which range in sector from biotechnology to NFP to agriculture. On a day-to-day basis I work to help align the needs of boards, management and investors, and have also recently led a ‘whole of organisation governance workshop for the Governance Institute of Australia.

What are your passions outside of work?

My precious children lead the list here. Saying that, opportunity and safety for all children is a passion, as is economic and social equity. On a lighter note, music – from classical through to house – has always been a passion, and yoga is a newly found joy.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Member : Anthony Goodwin
The Brisbane Club

Meet a Member – Anthony Goodwin

Anthony Goodwin

Anthony Goodwin - Brisbane Club Member

What prompted you to become a Member?

My brother-in-law introduced me to the club in about 1971 and nominated me when I returned to Brisbane in 1983. My major aim then was to use it for marketing purposes, but I soon found that it was also a wonderful haven for a break from the pressures of the day with a sandwich and a bit of quiet reflection at lunch time.

What do you enjoy most about the Club?

The standards it sets and which are happily maintained by my fellow members.

Are you a regular attendee of any Special Interest Groups or what would entice you to join one?

I have recently become a member of Out-of-Towners and The Seniors and have gone to two Photography meetings which I really enjoyed. I was a baritone with the club choir for many years and have only had to give that up because we’ve moved away from Brisbane. However the most significant group for me is the First Thursday Lunch Group, now in its 28th year. I had a small role in setting it up in 1990 with the lion’s share being done by John Tibbits.

The simple criteria he set at that time have proven to be the reason for our success and why so many other similar groups have thrived with his initiative and drive. With seven members still from that very first lunch and all eleven very committed to our ongoing success it is a club within a club that I cherish. That, surely, is the purpose of a Special Interest Group.

What do you enjoy about being a Club Ambassador?

Feeling the freedom to go and talk to anyone at any time and at any function. Of course every member of the club should also feel that freedom but most will be like I am; a bit conservative about interrupting others. But if I could give one message to other members from this experience of being an Ambassador it is that such interruptions are universally welcome and generate the most enjoyable conversations. Getting to know other people has to be one of the main purposes for being a member of a club like ours and just walking up and saying hello is a good way to do it.

What was a memorable event you experienced within the Club?

Denise, my wife and I were married in the Club, with the ceremony taking place on Level 2. It happened to coincide with the 1992 AGM and some delightful, funny and most unexpected things happened. We will never forget it.

What are your passions outside of work?

We have a canal boat in the Netherlands on which we spend 3 months every year. I sing with The Blenders on the Gold Coast. We live in The Ecovillage in Currumbin Valley. I’ve got a workshop and a bike: I have two sons and two step-daughters and a wonderful wife.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Member: Paul Dunn of Exclaim IT & Exclaim Executive

Meet
a
Member

Anthony
Goodwin

Anthony Goodwin

Anthony Goodwin - Brisbane Club Member

What prompted you to become a Member?

My brother-in-law introduced me to the club in about 1971 and nominated me when I returned to Brisbane in 1983. My major aim then was to use it for marketing purposes, but I soon found that it was also a wonderful haven for a break from the pressures of the day with a sandwich and a bit of quiet reflection at lunch time.

What do you enjoy most about the Club?

The standards it sets and which are happily maintained by my fellow members.

Are you a regular attendee of any Special Interest Groups or what would entice you to join one?

I have recently become a member of Out-of-Towners and The Seniors and have gone to two Photography meetings which I really enjoyed. I was a baritone with the club choir for many years and have only had to give that up because we’ve moved away from Brisbane. However the most significant group for me is the First Thursday Lunch Group, now in its 28th year. I had a small role in setting it up in 1990 with the lion’s share being done by John Tibbits.

The simple criteria he set at that time have proven to be the reason for our success and why so many other similar groups have thrived with his initiative and drive. With seven members still from that very first lunch and all eleven very committed to our ongoing success it is a club within a club that I cherish. That, surely, is the purpose of a Special Interest Group.

What do you enjoy about being a Club Ambassador?

Feeling the freedom to go and talk to anyone at any time and at any function. Of course every member of the club should also feel that freedom but most will be like I am; a bit conservative about interrupting others. But if I could give one message to other members from this experience of being an Ambassador it is that such interruptions are universally welcome and generate the most enjoyable conversations. Getting to know other people has to be one of the main purposes for being a member of a club like ours and just walking up and saying hello is a good way to do it.

What was a memorable event you experienced within the Club?

Denise, my wife and I were married in the Club, with the ceremony taking place on Level 2. It happened to coincide with the 1992 AGM and some delightful, funny and most unexpected things happened. We will never forget it.

What are your passions outside of work?

We have a canal boat in the Netherlands on which we spend 3 months every year. I sing with The Blenders on the Gold Coast. We live in The Ecovillage in Currumbin Valley. I’ve got a workshop and a bike: I have two sons and two step-daughters and a wonderful wife.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Member: Paul Dunn of Exclaim IT & Exclaim Executive
The Brisbane Club

Meet a Convenor – Bruce Wallis: Golf Group

Bruce Wallis
Golf Group Convenor

Bruce Wallis - Golf group convenor at The Brisbane Club


What are the benefits of being involved in a special interest group and in particular the Golf group at the Brisbane Club?


Our Club Membership is diverse in interests, ages and availability for “outside” functions and companionship. Meeting other members through shared interests provides a great opportunity for other networking and friendships. Golf allows these opportunities in an open environment. Unfortunately, we haven’t translated this into regular golf usage of Club facilities.

What types of events do you hold within your group?


Our golf group continues a fine history of three major events and social golf early in the year. Each year we are challenged by The Downs Club from Toowoomba either on the range or in a Brisbane setting. We play for The Hodge Roberts Trophy, which, when we retain it, is on display in the bar of the Club. Later in the year, we play the Queensland Club for a Trophy which is similarly displayed when we hold it, although unfortunately, it is currently held by them. In November , we play our Championships with Single and Fourball Shields embossed and displayed in the bar.

What numbers do you get coming to your events and how has the group evolved over time?

We have over 200 members identified with the golf group, but timing and diverse availability have restricted our numbers to approximately 17-24 at each event, as golfers seem to live active, roaming lives. We have happily seen the involvement of some Associate members who of course are most welcome to play with us.

What kinds of topics do you discuss regarding Golf and why do believe it is important to have as a special interest group?

Well unlike the Fishing group, we have had the one that got away on the putting green. There is plenty of discussion on any topic at our events.

What do you hope to achieve within special interest groups and encouraging more people to be involved and join one?

The richness of experience within our Membership provides a wonderful opportunity to learn, meet and enjoy the many interests on offer. If your time permits, and your interests are wide, the Club interest groups can deliver real value.

How has your experience been as the Golf Convenor after 4 years in the role?

The ongoing benefit has been meeting some of our different membership in what can be a relaxed environment, and so it has been rewarding and fun. I recommend involvement at any level to any member or associate.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Convenor: Theresa Moltoni - Workplace Relations Group

 

Meet
a
Convenor

Bruce
Wallis:
Golf
Group

Bruce Wallis
Golf Group Convenor

Bruce Wallis - Golf group convenor at The Brisbane Club


What are the benefits of being involved in a special interest group and in particular the Golf group at the Brisbane Club?


Our Club Membership is diverse in interests, ages and availability for “outside” functions and companionship. Meeting other members through shared interests provides a great opportunity for other networking and friendships. Golf allows these opportunities in an open environment. Unfortunately, we haven’t translated this into regular golf usage of Club facilities.

What types of events do you hold within your group?


Our golf group continues a fine history of three major events and social golf early in the year. Each year we are challenged by The Downs Club from Toowoomba either on the range or in a Brisbane setting. We play for The Hodge Roberts Trophy, which, when we retain it, is on display in the bar of the Club. Later in the year, we play the Queensland Club for a Trophy which is similarly displayed when we hold it, although unfortunately, it is currently held by them. In November , we play our Championships with Single and Fourball Shields embossed and displayed in the bar.

What numbers do you get coming to your events and how has the group evolved over time?

We have over 200 members identified with the golf group, but timing and diverse availability have restricted our numbers to approximately 17-24 at each event, as golfers seem to live active, roaming lives. We have happily seen the involvement of some Associate members who of course are most welcome to play with us.

What kinds of topics do you discuss regarding Golf and why do believe it is important to have as a special interest group?

Well unlike the Fishing group, we have had the one that got away on the putting green. There is plenty of discussion on any topic at our events.

What do you hope to achieve within special interest groups and encouraging more people to be involved and join one?

The richness of experience within our Membership provides a wonderful opportunity to learn, meet and enjoy the many interests on offer. If your time permits, and your interests are wide, the Club interest groups can deliver real value.

How has your experience been as the Golf Convenor after 4 years in the role?

The ongoing benefit has been meeting some of our different membership in what can be a relaxed environment, and so it has been rewarding and fun. I recommend involvement at any level to any member or associate.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Convenor: Theresa Moltoni - Workplace Relations Group

 
The Brisbane Club

Meet a Convenor – Greg Vickery: Brisbane Club Arts Group

Greg Vickery
Brisbane Club Arts Group Convenor

Greg Vickery1

What are the benefits of being involved in a Special Interest Group and in particular the Arts Group at the Brisbane Club?

It enables you to meet other club members who share a common passion for or interest in the arts and to hear from key people involved in both Visual and Performing Arts in Queensland.

What types of events do you hold within your group?

I have only been in this role since late last year when the name of the group was changed from ‘Fine Arts’ to the more prosaic/more contemporary term, ‘Arts’, which was considered to be more inclusive. I have not had much involvement with the group in the past due to work and Red Cross commitments and I acknowledge the commitment of my predecessors and their committee members, several of whom such as Jonathan and Bruce Blocksidge and Lorelle Pacello continue to support the re-named group.

It is an honour to be the Arts group convenor as it provides a special opportunity for me to spend quality time with members and non-members involved in the Arts in Queensland.

What numbers do you get coming to your events and how has the group evolved over time?

We aim to get at least 20 people to each club luncheon and for our external events but more are welcome. At the Brisbane Club Music Awards dinner last year we attracted 70 people and we hope to do at least as well this year on November 9.

What kinds of topics do you discuss regarding Arts and why do you believe it is important to have as a Special Interest Group?

Our luncheons are focused on the topic chosen by the guest speaker in either the performing or visual arts who are either arts administrators, sponsors of the arts or artists themselves. For example, at our next luncheon on Thursday 23 February we have Patrick Pickett the CEO of the Qld Pops Orchestra as our special guest. After that we have Dr Rob Pensalfini from the Qld Shakespeare Ensemble on March 23, Dr Dimitri Kopenakis from the Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts on May 25, followed by Rachel Crowley from the Brisbane Airport Corporation talking about arts philanthropy on July 28. We have also planned a tour of the Club’s art collection combined with a wine tasting in the late afternoon of July 5.

What do you hope to achieve within Special Interest Groups and encouraging more people to be involved and join one?

It’s a great way to spend time with and to meet new people. It helps break the ice so much more easily if you share a common interest in a particular subject.

We are also looking to organise more activities with other Club interest groups in a common subject area, so that those in the Arts group can meet club members from other groups.
The late afternoon tour of the club’s art collection in July with the wine tasting enables Arts group members to mix with and to get to know better, members of the club’s wine group.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Convenor: Bruce Wallis - Golf Group

Meet
a
Convenor

Greg
Vickery:
Brisbane
Club
Arts
Group

Greg Vickery
Brisbane Club Arts Group Convenor

Greg Vickery1

What are the benefits of being involved in a Special Interest Group and in particular the Arts Group at the Brisbane Club?

It enables you to meet other club members who share a common passion for or interest in the arts and to hear from key people involved in both Visual and Performing Arts in Queensland.

What types of events do you hold within your group?

I have only been in this role since late last year when the name of the group was changed from ‘Fine Arts’ to the more prosaic/more contemporary term, ‘Arts’, which was considered to be more inclusive. I have not had much involvement with the group in the past due to work and Red Cross commitments and I acknowledge the commitment of my predecessors and their committee members, several of whom such as Jonathan and Bruce Blocksidge and Lorelle Pacello continue to support the re-named group.

It is an honour to be the Arts group convenor as it provides a special opportunity for me to spend quality time with members and non-members involved in the Arts in Queensland.

What numbers do you get coming to your events and how has the group evolved over time?

We aim to get at least 20 people to each club luncheon and for our external events but more are welcome. At the Brisbane Club Music Awards dinner last year we attracted 70 people and we hope to do at least as well this year on November 9.

What kinds of topics do you discuss regarding Arts and why do you believe it is important to have as a Special Interest Group?

Our luncheons are focused on the topic chosen by the guest speaker in either the performing or visual arts who are either arts administrators, sponsors of the arts or artists themselves. For example, at our next luncheon on Thursday 23 February we have Patrick Pickett the CEO of the Qld Pops Orchestra as our special guest. After that we have Dr Rob Pensalfini from the Qld Shakespeare Ensemble on March 23, Dr Dimitri Kopenakis from the Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts on May 25, followed by Rachel Crowley from the Brisbane Airport Corporation talking about arts philanthropy on July 28. We have also planned a tour of the Club’s art collection combined with a wine tasting in the late afternoon of July 5.

What do you hope to achieve within Special Interest Groups and encouraging more people to be involved and join one?

It’s a great way to spend time with and to meet new people. It helps break the ice so much more easily if you share a common interest in a particular subject.

We are also looking to organise more activities with other Club interest groups in a common subject area, so that those in the Arts group can meet club members from other groups.
The late afternoon tour of the club’s art collection in July with the wine tasting enables Arts group members to mix with and to get to know better, members of the club’s wine group.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Convenor: Bruce Wallis - Golf Group
The Brisbane Club

International Women’s Day with Tracey Vieira

International Women’s Day with Tracey Vieira

International Women’s Day with guest speaker, CEO of Screen Queensland, Tracey Vieira

The International Women’s Day lunch was a wonderful event with CEO of Screen Queensland, Tracey Vieria speaking about her story to success. She also spoke about women in the screen industry and how they impact young women in everyday life, especially to set an example for the next generation of strong women. Tracey also spoke about the ‘Be Bold For Change’ movement. A big thank you to Dale Spender who spoke on behalf of the incredible Second Chance Programme Fundraising Group who raise money for homeless women.

Here is a snippet of Tracey's moving speech at the successful International Women's Day on the 8th March 2017.

Where did all the girls go?

Storytelling is what connects us to our humanity. It is what links us to our past, and provides a glimpse into our future.

And there has never been in my opinion a more important time than now to ensure our screens tell stories that challenge our thinking, opens our eyes and ignites us into collective action to make this world a better place.

There is a powerful movement to see more gender equity on boards, in senior roles, in STEM and across many industries and the screen industry is equally failing at equality (The disparity is most notable in traditional film with just 32% of women working as producers, 23% as writers and only 16% as directors as reported by Screen Australia in 2015). And perhaps for us, we have a bigger responsibility than just in jobs and pay as the influence of screen content on behaviors is well documented.

Given many children engage in screen content from very early in their lives, consider this.

When black boys, white girls, and black girls watch television their self-esteem goes down and the more they watch the lower it goes. When white boys watch television, their self-esteem goes up.

The research done across 396 communities in the US by Nicole Martins and Kristen Harrison shows that girls appear to be influenced by one-dimensional, sexualized depictions of women, while black boys may be disturbed by their TV counterparts, who are often criminalized or shown as hoodlums and buffoons. She adds that white boys may experience the opposite effect because they tend to identify with powerful characters.

The Geena Davis Institute reports that from 2006 to 2009, not one female character was depicted in G-rated family films in the field of medical science, as a business leader, in law, or politics. In these films, 80.5% of all working characters are male and 19.5% are female, which is a contrast to real world statistics, where women comprise 50% of the workforce.

Males outnumber females 3 to 1 in family films. In contrast, females comprise just over 50% of the population in Australia. Even more staggering is the fact that this ratio, as seen in family films, is the same as it was in 1946.

You may wonder if it isn't enough to present programming to youngsters that is 'safe' and educational. But I would say that its not if there are fewer characters who are female than male and not if the female characters have less important information to share or are stereotyped. With time and repeated exposure, children come to normalize inequality in storytelling.

How often do you sit with a child and actually notice that girls are actually missing on screen? In the Pixar film Nemo, there is only one female apparently in the entire ocean….

In The Little Mermaid, a film that is so beloved it has been remade 5 times, men have three times as many lines as women. And then there is Despicable Me, Monsters Inc., Cars, Madagascar and I don’t even need to talk about The Smurfs and how Smurfette is out there all alone...

The reality is that girls and women make up half the population and our content should reflect that. We need to say as a community that this matters as often the choices about making characters’ male by default is unconscious. If we truly want change at the top end of business with diversity and gender that is representative of us as a country, then we have to change our view of gender to one of consciousness especially in on our screens and our children’s content.

ALSO READ:
Members' Review of the Workplace Relations Group Lunch with Guest Speaker APM Nigel Hadgkiss

International
Women’s
Day
with
Tracey
Vieira

International Women’s Day with Tracey Vieira

International Women’s Day with guest speaker, CEO of Screen Queensland, Tracey Vieira

The International Women’s Day lunch was a wonderful event with CEO of Screen Queensland, Tracey Vieria speaking about her story to success. She also spoke about women in the screen industry and how they impact young women in everyday life, especially to set an example for the next generation of strong women. Tracey also spoke about the ‘Be Bold For Change’ movement. A big thank you to Dale Spender who spoke on behalf of the incredible Second Chance Programme Fundraising Group who raise money for homeless women.

Here is a snippet of Tracey's moving speech at the successful International Women's Day on the 8th March 2017.

Where did all the girls go?

Storytelling is what connects us to our humanity. It is what links us to our past, and provides a glimpse into our future.

And there has never been in my opinion a more important time than now to ensure our screens tell stories that challenge our thinking, opens our eyes and ignites us into collective action to make this world a better place.

There is a powerful movement to see more gender equity on boards, in senior roles, in STEM and across many industries and the screen industry is equally failing at equality (The disparity is most notable in traditional film with just 32% of women working as producers, 23% as writers and only 16% as directors as reported by Screen Australia in 2015). And perhaps for us, we have a bigger responsibility than just in jobs and pay as the influence of screen content on behaviors is well documented.

Given many children engage in screen content from very early in their lives, consider this.

When black boys, white girls, and black girls watch television their self-esteem goes down and the more they watch the lower it goes. When white boys watch television, their self-esteem goes up.

The research done across 396 communities in the US by Nicole Martins and Kristen Harrison shows that girls appear to be influenced by one-dimensional, sexualized depictions of women, while black boys may be disturbed by their TV counterparts, who are often criminalized or shown as hoodlums and buffoons. She adds that white boys may experience the opposite effect because they tend to identify with powerful characters.

The Geena Davis Institute reports that from 2006 to 2009, not one female character was depicted in G-rated family films in the field of medical science, as a business leader, in law, or politics. In these films, 80.5% of all working characters are male and 19.5% are female, which is a contrast to real world statistics, where women comprise 50% of the workforce.

Males outnumber females 3 to 1 in family films. In contrast, females comprise just over 50% of the population in Australia. Even more staggering is the fact that this ratio, as seen in family films, is the same as it was in 1946.

You may wonder if it isn't enough to present programming to youngsters that is 'safe' and educational. But I would say that its not if there are fewer characters who are female than male and not if the female characters have less important information to share or are stereotyped. With time and repeated exposure, children come to normalize inequality in storytelling.

How often do you sit with a child and actually notice that girls are actually missing on screen? In the Pixar film Nemo, there is only one female apparently in the entire ocean….

In The Little Mermaid, a film that is so beloved it has been remade 5 times, men have three times as many lines as women. And then there is Despicable Me, Monsters Inc., Cars, Madagascar and I don’t even need to talk about The Smurfs and how Smurfette is out there all alone...

The reality is that girls and women make up half the population and our content should reflect that. We need to say as a community that this matters as often the choices about making characters’ male by default is unconscious. If we truly want change at the top end of business with diversity and gender that is representative of us as a country, then we have to change our view of gender to one of consciousness especially in on our screens and our children’s content.

ALSO READ:
Members' Review of the Workplace Relations Group Lunch with Guest Speaker APM Nigel Hadgkiss
The Brisbane Club

CEO Luncheon Case Study

The Brisbane Club has the experience to ensure your corporate function is a success. With every function held at The Brisbane Club, our team deliver exemplary standards of excellence, superb menus and unrivalled service to ensure your event is an outstanding success.

MOQdigital recently hosted their CEO Lunch at The Brisbane Club, inviting eighteen CEO & CIO's to a 3-course meal, served around presentations from Guest Speakers and VIPs. The event was a complete success. If you want to know more about hosting a corporate lunch at The Brisbane Club, read our case study.

read the case study button

CEO
Luncheon
Case
Study

The Brisbane Club has the experience to ensure your corporate function is a success. With every function held at The Brisbane Club, our team deliver exemplary standards of excellence, superb menus and unrivalled service to ensure your event is an outstanding success.

MOQdigital recently hosted their CEO Lunch at The Brisbane Club, inviting eighteen CEO & CIO's to a 3-course meal, served around presentations from Guest Speakers and VIPs. The event was a complete success. If you want to know more about hosting a corporate lunch at The Brisbane Club, read our case study.

read the case study button
The Brisbane Club

This week at The Brisbane Club: 20 – 24 March 2017

On Tuesday the Senior Cru had their monthly lunch and on Wednesday they celebrated again for the much anticipated Annual Senior Members Luncheon. On Thursday the Arts Group came together for lunch joined by guest speaker, artistic director of the Queensland Shakespeare ensemble, Dr. Rob Pensalfini. Tonight is the Club Chorale Concert accompanied by the Club Band, performing classic Old West Cowboy Choruses!

 

This
week
at
The
Brisbane
Club:
20

24
March
2017

On Tuesday the Senior Cru had their monthly lunch and on Wednesday they celebrated again for the much anticipated Annual Senior Members Luncheon. On Thursday the Arts Group came together for lunch joined by guest speaker, artistic director of the Queensland Shakespeare ensemble, Dr. Rob Pensalfini. Tonight is the Club Chorale Concert accompanied by the Club Band, performing classic Old West Cowboy Choruses!

 
The Brisbane Club

Meet a Member – Sue Forrester

Sue Forrester

corp head shot Sue Forrester

Sue Forrester is a Club Ambassador, on the Wine Sub - Committee and a Member of The Brisbane Club. Sue has been part of the Club for almost 8 years and has answered a few questions about her experience being a Member and about Club life.

What prompted you to become a Member?

I knew so many members of the Club, admired what the Club does and what it stands for, and I was very much drawn to its diverse membership base. It was not a difficult decision to make.

What do you enjoy most about the Club?

The camaraderie, the friendships and the food and wine. Probably in the reverse order since I have joined the Wine Sub - Committee.

Are you a regular attendee of any Special Interest Groups or what would entice you to join one?

I am a member of the Wine Sub - Committee and the Property Group – that keeps me busy and my monthly invoices high.

What was a memorable event you experienced within the Club?

There are too many…My father’s 75th birthday dinner in the Presidents Room, The Grand Dames Champagne Club night showcasing Rose Champagnes and Dancing to Saturday Night Fever at Bronwyn Morris’ Presidents At Home!

What do you enjoy about being a Club Ambassador?

The old adage of “find a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life” is true. It’s humbling and a privilege to represent the Club and to speak about the benefits of membership, to meet new members and to showcase our terrific facilities.

Have you hosted any of your own functions at the Club?

I am enormously proud of the Grande Dames Club and the 40 members we have.

What kind of events would you be interested in seeing the Club host?

Boardroom-style lunches and dinners for Directors and Chairs. There is a lot of knowledge and experience among our membership that really should be shared. Wine flight tastings from the bar with accompanying food. An annual gin tasting.

What do you enjoy most about being a Member of the Wine Sub - Committee?

The honour of working with such esteemed wine aficionados, assisting the Cellar Staff to develop the wine list, collating the annual cellar calendar and hosting wine events. Each month we taste up to 30 wines, on a seasonal basis, to ensure our wine list stays current and up to date with emerging trends. It’s tough work… but someone has to do it.

Have you utilised any Member benefits and if not which ones do you feel you would most like to take advantage of?

As an independent director with a diverse portfolio across several states, I was looking for a ‘home base’ from which to work whilst in the city. The Business Lounge is an excellent place to work, review papers and take calls. The Gold Class taxi service is superb and I have stayed at our reciprocal Clubs in Sydney and London.

Have you brought many guests to visit, if so what have they liked about the Club?

Most guests are surprised to see such a high proportion of business women at the Club, and the warmth of members and their real desire to interact. Think the opposite of ‘staid and stuffy’ and you have the Members’ Lounge. Fellow board members really enjoy the President’s Room for meetings – it is just the right size, stately and has natural light flooding in from Post Office Square.

What does it mean to you to be part of the Brisbane Club community?

I have an enormous number of professional colleagues, friends and family who are part of my extended Club community. I feel supported and listened to, and a part of something larger that brings real value to the membership base.

What are your passions outside the Club?

Food, wine, gourmet travel and thoughtful design.

For more information on Membership at The Brisbane Club, please see our Membership page

ALSO READ:
Meet a Member: Melanie Farris of New Cavendish Managment Consulting

Meet
a
Member

Sue
Forrester

Sue Forrester

corp head shot Sue Forrester

Sue Forrester is a Club Ambassador, on the Wine Sub - Committee and a Member of The Brisbane Club. Sue has been part of the Club for almost 8 years and has answered a few questions about her experience being a Member and about Club life.

What prompted you to become a Member?

I knew so many members of the Club, admired what the Club does and what it stands for, and I was very much drawn to its diverse membership base. It was not a difficult decision to make.

What do you enjoy most about the Club?

The camaraderie, the friendships and the food and wine. Probably in the reverse order since I have joined the Wine Sub - Committee.

Are you a regular attendee of any Special Interest Groups or what would entice you to join one?

I am a member of the Wine Sub - Committee and the Property Group – that keeps me busy and my monthly invoices high.

What was a memorable event you experienced within the Club?

There are too many…My father’s 75th birthday dinner in the Presidents Room, The Grand Dames Champagne Club night showcasing Rose Champagnes and Dancing to Saturday Night Fever at Bronwyn Morris’ Presidents At Home!

What do you enjoy about being a Club Ambassador?

The old adage of “find a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life” is true. It’s humbling and a privilege to represent the Club and to speak about the benefits of membership, to meet new members and to showcase our terrific facilities.

Have you hosted any of your own functions at the Club?

I am enormously proud of the Grande Dames Club and the 40 members we have.

What kind of events would you be interested in seeing the Club host?

Boardroom-style lunches and dinners for Directors and Chairs. There is a lot of knowledge and experience among our membership that really should be shared. Wine flight tastings from the bar with accompanying food. An annual gin tasting.

What do you enjoy most about being a Member of the Wine Sub - Committee?

The honour of working with such esteemed wine aficionados, assisting the Cellar Staff to develop the wine list, collating the annual cellar calendar and hosting wine events. Each month we taste up to 30 wines, on a seasonal basis, to ensure our wine list stays current and up to date with emerging trends. It’s tough work… but someone has to do it.

Have you utilised any Member benefits and if not which ones do you feel you would most like to take advantage of?

As an independent director with a diverse portfolio across several states, I was looking for a ‘home base’ from which to work whilst in the city. The Business Lounge is an excellent place to work, review papers and take calls. The Gold Class taxi service is superb and I have stayed at our reciprocal Clubs in Sydney and London.

Have you brought many guests to visit, if so what have they liked about the Club?

Most guests are surprised to see such a high proportion of business women at the Club, and the warmth of members and their real desire to interact. Think the opposite of ‘staid and stuffy’ and you have the Members’ Lounge. Fellow board members really enjoy the President’s Room for meetings – it is just the right size, stately and has natural light flooding in from Post Office Square.

What does it mean to you to be part of the Brisbane Club community?

I have an enormous number of professional colleagues, friends and family who are part of my extended Club community. I feel supported and listened to, and a part of something larger that brings real value to the membership base.

What are your passions outside the Club?

Food, wine, gourmet travel and thoughtful design.

For more information on Membership at The Brisbane Club, please see our Membership page

ALSO READ:
Meet a Member: Melanie Farris of New Cavendish Managment Consulting
The Brisbane Club

Meet a Convenor – Dean Prangley: Out of Towners Group

Dean Prangley
Out of Towners Group Convenor

Dean Prangley - Out of Towners group convenor at The Brisbane Club

Dean Prangley is a Past President of the Club, the Special Interest Group Convenor for the Out of Towners Group and a Member of The Brisbane Club. Dean has been part of the Club for over 40 years and has answered a few questions about his experience being a Special Interest Group Convenor and about his time at the Club.

What are the benefits of being involved in a Special Interest Group and in particular the Out of Towners Group at the Brisbane Club?

Special interest groups foster genuine relationships amongst like minded people and bring an additional benefit to the normal day to day usage of the Club. The Out of Towners group is there for those members who run their businesses from outside of the CBD and brings a large number of diversified business people together.

What do you enjoy about being the Out of Towners Group Convenor?

The regular banter and fun of the occasion where we can be serious one minute and roaring with laughter the next.

What types of events do you hold within your group?

There is no agenda and we seldom have a guest speaker. We do ask new OOTers to tell their story but apart from that, it is anything goes.

What numbers do you get coming to your events and how has the group evolved over time?

We average around 15 each luncheon but have had as many as 22 which strains the cellar table somewhat. We initially began with about six members but this has grown over the years and more recently we have been joined by more younger members including ladies who are really enjoying the occasion.

What kinds of topics do you discuss and why do believe it is important to have as a Special Interest Group?

We seem to concentrate on those topics which affect those in business from all perspectives from world events to State and local politics. This can change quickly to leisure activities, sport, boats, cars and travel. The odd joke is sometimes aired.

Why are you passionate about the Out of Towners Group and where did it start for you?

About 16 years ago when my business in Industrial Real Estate was based in Rocklea I discovered a number of Club members also had businesses in the Industrial areas. These members explained that they seldom attended the Club by day and only occasionally in the evening because of parking, distance etc. I decided to trial a lunch where all of those out of town business members could come and enjoy the company of fellow industrialists. About six came to the first one and it grew from there. We expanded the area to include all businesses outside the CBD so now we have attendees from Cleveland, Gold Coast, Toowoomba, Ipswich and close in such as Bowen Hills, Paddington and Milton.

What is your favourite thing about being part of The Brisbane Club community?

I have always felt at home in the Club and have made many good friends over the years. The quality of management, staff and Members brings harmony and peace from the outside world and it has always been a nice place to be.

What do you enjoy about the Club and what kinds of Club events do you like to attend?

I enjoy the Heritage group, Motoring group and special occasions such as Rugby breakfasts.

What do you hope to achieve within Special Interest Groups and encouraging more people to be involved and join one?

A place where men and women in business feel comfortable and well cared for and to enjoy the Club in general and their chosen interest groups in particular.

For more information on Membership at The Brisbane Club, please see our Membership page

ALSO READ:
Meet a Convenor: Greg Vickery - Arts Group

Meet
a
Convenor

Dean
Prangley:
Out
of
Towners
Group

Dean Prangley
Out of Towners Group Convenor

Dean Prangley - Out of Towners group convenor at The Brisbane Club

Dean Prangley is a Past President of the Club, the Special Interest Group Convenor for the Out of Towners Group and a Member of The Brisbane Club. Dean has been part of the Club for over 40 years and has answered a few questions about his experience being a Special Interest Group Convenor and about his time at the Club.

What are the benefits of being involved in a Special Interest Group and in particular the Out of Towners Group at the Brisbane Club?

Special interest groups foster genuine relationships amongst like minded people and bring an additional benefit to the normal day to day usage of the Club. The Out of Towners group is there for those members who run their businesses from outside of the CBD and brings a large number of diversified business people together.

What do you enjoy about being the Out of Towners Group Convenor?

The regular banter and fun of the occasion where we can be serious one minute and roaring with laughter the next.

What types of events do you hold within your group?

There is no agenda and we seldom have a guest speaker. We do ask new OOTers to tell their story but apart from that, it is anything goes.

What numbers do you get coming to your events and how has the group evolved over time?

We average around 15 each luncheon but have had as many as 22 which strains the cellar table somewhat. We initially began with about six members but this has grown over the years and more recently we have been joined by more younger members including ladies who are really enjoying the occasion.

What kinds of topics do you discuss and why do believe it is important to have as a Special Interest Group?

We seem to concentrate on those topics which affect those in business from all perspectives from world events to State and local politics. This can change quickly to leisure activities, sport, boats, cars and travel. The odd joke is sometimes aired.

Why are you passionate about the Out of Towners Group and where did it start for you?

About 16 years ago when my business in Industrial Real Estate was based in Rocklea I discovered a number of Club members also had businesses in the Industrial areas. These members explained that they seldom attended the Club by day and only occasionally in the evening because of parking, distance etc. I decided to trial a lunch where all of those out of town business members could come and enjoy the company of fellow industrialists. About six came to the first one and it grew from there. We expanded the area to include all businesses outside the CBD so now we have attendees from Cleveland, Gold Coast, Toowoomba, Ipswich and close in such as Bowen Hills, Paddington and Milton.

What is your favourite thing about being part of The Brisbane Club community?

I have always felt at home in the Club and have made many good friends over the years. The quality of management, staff and Members brings harmony and peace from the outside world and it has always been a nice place to be.

What do you enjoy about the Club and what kinds of Club events do you like to attend?

I enjoy the Heritage group, Motoring group and special occasions such as Rugby breakfasts.

What do you hope to achieve within Special Interest Groups and encouraging more people to be involved and join one?

A place where men and women in business feel comfortable and well cared for and to enjoy the Club in general and their chosen interest groups in particular.

For more information on Membership at The Brisbane Club, please see our Membership page

ALSO READ:
Meet a Convenor: Greg Vickery - Arts Group
The Brisbane Club

This week at The Brisbane Club: 30th January – 3rd February 2017


This week at The Brisbane Club: Welcome to 2017 and the start of February! The Lounge and Members Dining Room and fully open from this week and on Wednesday the Out of Towners Group celebrated their first lunch of the year. On Thursday the First Thursdays Groups; Dodgy (celebrating their 10th anniversary), FLLG, FTLG, Journeymen and 11 Wise Men had their February luncheon and the Terre a Terre Pop Up Wine Tasting was a hit!

This
week
at
The
Brisbane
Club:

30th
January

3rd
February
2017


This week at The Brisbane Club: Welcome to 2017 and the start of February! The Lounge and Members Dining Room and fully open from this week and on Wednesday the Out of Towners Group celebrated their first lunch of the year. On Thursday the First Thursdays Groups; Dodgy (celebrating their 10th anniversary), FLLG, FTLG, Journeymen and 11 Wise Men had their February luncheon and the Terre a Terre Pop Up Wine Tasting was a hit!