News

The Brisbane Club

This week at The Brisbane Club: 22 – 26 May 2017


Last week at The Brisbane Club:



On Wednesday the second Club Connect Networking Event of the year was a success. On Thursday the Arts Group were joined by guest speaker the CEO of Aboriginal Centre for Performing Arts, Dimitri Kopanakis and some of the performers from the centre showcased their talents throughout the lunch.




The new Special Interest Group, Legal had their initial group lunch with guest speaker, Chief Justice of Queensland The Honourable Catherine Holmes.



 



On Friday the much - anticipated Duck and Pinot Dinner took place and all had a wonderful time.



 



This
week
at
The
Brisbane
Club:
22

26
May
2017


Last week at The Brisbane Club:



On Wednesday the second Club Connect Networking Event of the year was a success. On Thursday the Arts Group were joined by guest speaker the CEO of Aboriginal Centre for Performing Arts, Dimitri Kopanakis and some of the performers from the centre showcased their talents throughout the lunch.




The new Special Interest Group, Legal had their initial group lunch with guest speaker, Chief Justice of Queensland The Honourable Catherine Holmes.



 



On Friday the much - anticipated Duck and Pinot Dinner took place and all had a wonderful time.



 



The Brisbane Club

This week at The Brisbane Club: 15 – 19 May 2017

On Tuesday the Senior Cru had their group lunch for May and one of the key defenders of free speech in the 2016 war over political correctness, Tony Morris QC joined the Workplace Relations Group for lunch. Yesterday the Gourmet Enthusiasts Dinner was theme was Paris Bistro and everyone enjoyed all things French! Today is Fishing Group lunch and tonight the Club Jazz will be performing in the Member's Lounge!

This
week
at
The
Brisbane
Club:
15

19
May
2017

On Tuesday the Senior Cru had their group lunch for May and one of the key defenders of free speech in the 2016 war over political correctness, Tony Morris QC joined the Workplace Relations Group for lunch. Yesterday the Gourmet Enthusiasts Dinner was theme was Paris Bistro and everyone enjoyed all things French! Today is Fishing Group lunch and tonight the Club Jazz will be performing in the Member's Lounge!
The Brisbane Club

Member’s Review of Workplace Relations Group Lunch with guest speaker APM, Australian Building and Construction Commissioner, Nigel Hadgkiss.

Workplace Relations Group with APM Nigel Hadgkiss.

Members, Elizabeth Addis, Stephanie Lewis and Lisa Myers’s review of the event below.

What enticed you to attend this event?

Elizabeth - I have been wanting to attend the Workplace Relations Lunch for business networking purposes and due to Theresa Moltoni being the host.

Stephanie - Working for Certica, a contractor management business in Brisbane, I attend the Workplace Lunches regularly. However, the opportunity to hear from and meet with Nigel Hadgkiss APM was a real draw card. With the re-establishment of the Australian Building and Construction Commission (ABCC) on 2 December 2016, I knew the subject would be topical and relevant for our business and most importantly our clients in the Building and Construction industry.

Lisa - I am a commercial dispute resolution and construction lawyer at a boutique firm, Scoglio Law. A number of our clients either work in or supply products to the construction industry and are impacted by the recent changes. The event was a great opportunity to hear directly from the Australian Building and Construction Commissioner so I can keep our clients up to date.

What was the highlight of the event in your opinion?

E - Nigel’s address gave a great insight into the role of the ABCC and how the building code will be enforced – an industry that I am not regularly exposed to. I also thought Theresa’s update on IR changes for the past month was a terrific summary for those in the audience who are not involved in the day to day IR process.

S - The highlight for me was the open Q&A at the conclusion of the presentation. Mr. Hadgkiss was transparent in his answers and provided practical advice to the audience on ways to communicate and work with the ABCC.

L- The Commissioner’s explanation of the new Building Code and the assistance the Commission is providing to enable construction industry participants to become code compliant was definitely the main highlight as it clarified quite a few of the misconceptions in the industry and will enable Scoglio Law to assist our clients in that regard.

Can you describe Nigel Hadgkiss PM, as a politician, speaker and entertainer in your own words?

S - Nigel Hadgkiss APM, provided the audience with practical and easy to understand advice. He offered a balanced view with regard to how the ABCC is working with both Unions and Employers and did not shy away from answering any audience questions. He was frank, transparent and not without a good sense of humour.

E - I appreciated that he was very direct in his comments and provided very interesting anecdotes for those in the audience who are not working within the building sector.

What were your thoughts on the issues discussed regarding legislative changes in the industry and how this will affect building industry participants?

S - It was refreshing to hear the facts in regard to the ABCC, rather than the maelstrom of propaganda being reported in the media. Of note, Mr. Hadgkiss highlighted that in no way does the ABCC attempt to diminish workers’ rights or to abolish any union movement. Rather that the ABCC exists to promote an improved workplace relations framework to ensure that building work is carried out fairly and productively for the benefit of all building industry participants, without distinction, and for the benefit of the Australian economy as a whole.

There was concern in the room with regard to the length of time taken to get Agreements approved by the ABCC, to which Mr. Hadgkiss provided practical tips to improve the approvals process. To his knowledge and to date at the event, he was not aware of any project being held up due to the approvals process.

L - There is a lot of uncertainty in the industry as to what the new Building Code means for particular construction companies. The Code applies to construction companies from the first time they submit an expression of interest and/or tender for Commonwealth-funded projects regardless of whether they’re successful. Once the Code applies then they have to remain compliant even on new privately funded projects. Our clients also often see us about security of payments disputes. The new code requires contractors to have documented dispute resolution processes to handle payment disputes with subcontractors. Contractors are also required to report delayed or disputed progress payments to the Commissioner and relevant funding entity as soon as practicable after the payment due date. These new requirements are aimed to assist subcontractors to get paid sooner and reduce the risk of insolvencies in the industry.

Did you learn anything new at the event?

E - Absolutely – a terrific beginners guide to the Building Code and the ABCC. Probably a little more information than I actually need!
S - I always do! Theresa Moltoni from IRIQ presents a 15 minute summary of Industrial Relations (IR) news at each month’s event and it’s the group’s very own version of Have you been paying attention? You were updated with the groups events for the month.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Convenor: Bruce Wallis - Golf Group

Member’s
Review
of
Workplace
Relations
Group
Lunch
with
guest
speaker
APM,
Australian
Building
and
Construction
Commissioner,
Nigel
Hadgkiss.

Workplace Relations Group with APM Nigel Hadgkiss.

Members, Elizabeth Addis, Stephanie Lewis and Lisa Myers’s review of the event below.

What enticed you to attend this event?

Elizabeth - I have been wanting to attend the Workplace Relations Lunch for business networking purposes and due to Theresa Moltoni being the host.

Stephanie - Working for Certica, a contractor management business in Brisbane, I attend the Workplace Lunches regularly. However, the opportunity to hear from and meet with Nigel Hadgkiss APM was a real draw card. With the re-establishment of the Australian Building and Construction Commission (ABCC) on 2 December 2016, I knew the subject would be topical and relevant for our business and most importantly our clients in the Building and Construction industry.

Lisa - I am a commercial dispute resolution and construction lawyer at a boutique firm, Scoglio Law. A number of our clients either work in or supply products to the construction industry and are impacted by the recent changes. The event was a great opportunity to hear directly from the Australian Building and Construction Commissioner so I can keep our clients up to date.

What was the highlight of the event in your opinion?

E - Nigel’s address gave a great insight into the role of the ABCC and how the building code will be enforced – an industry that I am not regularly exposed to. I also thought Theresa’s update on IR changes for the past month was a terrific summary for those in the audience who are not involved in the day to day IR process.

S - The highlight for me was the open Q&A at the conclusion of the presentation. Mr. Hadgkiss was transparent in his answers and provided practical advice to the audience on ways to communicate and work with the ABCC.

L- The Commissioner’s explanation of the new Building Code and the assistance the Commission is providing to enable construction industry participants to become code compliant was definitely the main highlight as it clarified quite a few of the misconceptions in the industry and will enable Scoglio Law to assist our clients in that regard.

Can you describe Nigel Hadgkiss PM, as a politician, speaker and entertainer in your own words?

S - Nigel Hadgkiss APM, provided the audience with practical and easy to understand advice. He offered a balanced view with regard to how the ABCC is working with both Unions and Employers and did not shy away from answering any audience questions. He was frank, transparent and not without a good sense of humour.

E - I appreciated that he was very direct in his comments and provided very interesting anecdotes for those in the audience who are not working within the building sector.

What were your thoughts on the issues discussed regarding legislative changes in the industry and how this will affect building industry participants?

S - It was refreshing to hear the facts in regard to the ABCC, rather than the maelstrom of propaganda being reported in the media. Of note, Mr. Hadgkiss highlighted that in no way does the ABCC attempt to diminish workers’ rights or to abolish any union movement. Rather that the ABCC exists to promote an improved workplace relations framework to ensure that building work is carried out fairly and productively for the benefit of all building industry participants, without distinction, and for the benefit of the Australian economy as a whole.

There was concern in the room with regard to the length of time taken to get Agreements approved by the ABCC, to which Mr. Hadgkiss provided practical tips to improve the approvals process. To his knowledge and to date at the event, he was not aware of any project being held up due to the approvals process.

L - There is a lot of uncertainty in the industry as to what the new Building Code means for particular construction companies. The Code applies to construction companies from the first time they submit an expression of interest and/or tender for Commonwealth-funded projects regardless of whether they’re successful. Once the Code applies then they have to remain compliant even on new privately funded projects. Our clients also often see us about security of payments disputes. The new code requires contractors to have documented dispute resolution processes to handle payment disputes with subcontractors. Contractors are also required to report delayed or disputed progress payments to the Commissioner and relevant funding entity as soon as practicable after the payment due date. These new requirements are aimed to assist subcontractors to get paid sooner and reduce the risk of insolvencies in the industry.

Did you learn anything new at the event?

E - Absolutely – a terrific beginners guide to the Building Code and the ABCC. Probably a little more information than I actually need!
S - I always do! Theresa Moltoni from IRIQ presents a 15 minute summary of Industrial Relations (IR) news at each month’s event and it’s the group’s very own version of Have you been paying attention? You were updated with the groups events for the month.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Convenor: Bruce Wallis - Golf Group
The Brisbane Club

Meet a Convenor – Theresa Moltoni OAM : Workplace Relations Group

Theresa Moltoni OAM
Convenor, Workplace Relations Group

Theresa Moltoni OAM - Convenor of the Workplace Relations Group

What are the benefits of being involved in a special interest group and in particular the Workplace Relations group at the Brisbane Club?


Special interest groups create an excellent opportunity to network with like-minded people who share similar interests. They also provide a great opportunity to learn something about a topic you love or to simply engage in one of your passions. Being a part of the Workplace Relations group, gives attendees an update each month on current issues, IR news and key decisions in this jurisdiction that provide a unique opportunity to stay informed! They also provide access to the key movers and shakers in this field with excellent speakers every month sharing their experiences and views, encouraging discussion, sharing concerns and identifying opportunities for reform.

What types of events do you hold within your group?

Our group has a monthly lunch event to discuss the important topics dominating industrial relations in Australia. Events are generally on a Wednesday and provide access to imminent people in this field. After lunch the key note speaker gives a talk on their chosen area. The forum is Chatham House rules which provides attendees with an opportunity for frank discussion.
At Christmas we have our annual Christmas Dinner and all guest speakers from the year are invited back to spend time with our attendees.

What numbers do you get coming to your events and how has the group evolved over time?

The workplace relations lunch attracts numbers of between 20 to 40 people for any one gathering. The group has evolved over time to encompass a diverse range of attendees from prominent business leaders, members of parliament, well respected practitioners, key leaders of the relevant tribunals and senior members of the bureaucracy.

What kinds of topics do you discuss regarding workplace relations and why do believe it is important to have as a special interest group?

Topics have included looking at the experiences of key businesses in IR such as Boral and Aurizon, Mike Kane and Mick Heenan, opinions from Industrial Relations Commentators such as Grace Collier and Dr Gary Johns. Heads of tribunals such as Justice Iain Ross the President of the Fair Work Commission and Kevin Cocks the head of the
Anti-Discrimination Commission of Queensland. We have also welcomed Steve Knott, Innis Willox and Wilhem Harnish as the National heads of key business groups as well as the heads of Government in the area of workplace relations at both State and Federal levels.

What do you hope to achieve within special interest groups and encouraging more people to be involved and join one?

The Workplace Relations group aims to keep people who manage people (which is most of us!) informed and well connected. It is the ideal environment to meet a diverse range of people and learn how you can manage your workplace better. Special interest groups are unique to our club and I guarantee when you find one that matches your interests you will be warmly welcomed!

ALSO READ:
Members' Review of the Workplace Relations Group Lunch with Guest Speaker APM Nigel Hadgkiss

Meet
a
Convenor

Theresa
Moltoni
OAM
:
Workplace
Relations
Group

Theresa Moltoni OAM
Convenor, Workplace Relations Group

Theresa Moltoni OAM - Convenor of the Workplace Relations Group

What are the benefits of being involved in a special interest group and in particular the Workplace Relations group at the Brisbane Club?


Special interest groups create an excellent opportunity to network with like-minded people who share similar interests. They also provide a great opportunity to learn something about a topic you love or to simply engage in one of your passions. Being a part of the Workplace Relations group, gives attendees an update each month on current issues, IR news and key decisions in this jurisdiction that provide a unique opportunity to stay informed! They also provide access to the key movers and shakers in this field with excellent speakers every month sharing their experiences and views, encouraging discussion, sharing concerns and identifying opportunities for reform.

What types of events do you hold within your group?

Our group has a monthly lunch event to discuss the important topics dominating industrial relations in Australia. Events are generally on a Wednesday and provide access to imminent people in this field. After lunch the key note speaker gives a talk on their chosen area. The forum is Chatham House rules which provides attendees with an opportunity for frank discussion.
At Christmas we have our annual Christmas Dinner and all guest speakers from the year are invited back to spend time with our attendees.

What numbers do you get coming to your events and how has the group evolved over time?

The workplace relations lunch attracts numbers of between 20 to 40 people for any one gathering. The group has evolved over time to encompass a diverse range of attendees from prominent business leaders, members of parliament, well respected practitioners, key leaders of the relevant tribunals and senior members of the bureaucracy.

What kinds of topics do you discuss regarding workplace relations and why do believe it is important to have as a special interest group?

Topics have included looking at the experiences of key businesses in IR such as Boral and Aurizon, Mike Kane and Mick Heenan, opinions from Industrial Relations Commentators such as Grace Collier and Dr Gary Johns. Heads of tribunals such as Justice Iain Ross the President of the Fair Work Commission and Kevin Cocks the head of the
Anti-Discrimination Commission of Queensland. We have also welcomed Steve Knott, Innis Willox and Wilhem Harnish as the National heads of key business groups as well as the heads of Government in the area of workplace relations at both State and Federal levels.

What do you hope to achieve within special interest groups and encouraging more people to be involved and join one?

The Workplace Relations group aims to keep people who manage people (which is most of us!) informed and well connected. It is the ideal environment to meet a diverse range of people and learn how you can manage your workplace better. Special interest groups are unique to our club and I guarantee when you find one that matches your interests you will be warmly welcomed!

ALSO READ:
Members' Review of the Workplace Relations Group Lunch with Guest Speaker APM Nigel Hadgkiss
The Brisbane Club

Meet a Member – Paul Dunn

Paul Dunn
Director - Connections and Engagement
Exclaim IT & Exclaim Executive

Paul Dunn - Brisbane Club Member

What does your business do?

For 10 years, Exclaim IT has built high level business relationships across Australia and through these relationships we identified an opportunity to bring an Executive offering to the marketplace. Exclaim Executive focuses on the strategic and executive level personnel requirements of the businesses we partner with whilst Exclaim IT continues to focus on IT & operational level personnel requirements.

What does your position entail?

My role within both organisations is to create B2B partnerships with the businesses we engage. This involves assisting Business Leaders to attract, recruit and retain the strategic and operational staff that will allow their business to achieve the results they are after.

Do you bring guests to the club?

I regularly bring guests to The Brisbane Club because my role involves meeting with many Business Leaders and Executives from all over Australia. In fact, the guests often comment on the club and the environment there.

As a returning member, what do you enjoy most about the club?

I really enjoy bringing clients and candidates to the club because it’s a relaxed environment that’s great for networking.

What are your passions outside of work?
Spending as much time with my wife & 2 daughters as I possibly can. I am also passionate about running and regularly enter marathons both here in Australia & internationally. Without doubt, good food would have to make the list too!

ALSO READ:
Meet a Member: Sonia McDonald of LeadershipHQ

Meet
a
Member

Paul
Dunn

Paul Dunn
Director - Connections and Engagement
Exclaim IT & Exclaim Executive

Paul Dunn - Brisbane Club Member

What does your business do?

For 10 years, Exclaim IT has built high level business relationships across Australia and through these relationships we identified an opportunity to bring an Executive offering to the marketplace. Exclaim Executive focuses on the strategic and executive level personnel requirements of the businesses we partner with whilst Exclaim IT continues to focus on IT & operational level personnel requirements.

What does your position entail?

My role within both organisations is to create B2B partnerships with the businesses we engage. This involves assisting Business Leaders to attract, recruit and retain the strategic and operational staff that will allow their business to achieve the results they are after.

Do you bring guests to the club?

I regularly bring guests to The Brisbane Club because my role involves meeting with many Business Leaders and Executives from all over Australia. In fact, the guests often comment on the club and the environment there.

As a returning member, what do you enjoy most about the club?

I really enjoy bringing clients and candidates to the club because it’s a relaxed environment that’s great for networking.

What are your passions outside of work?
Spending as much time with my wife & 2 daughters as I possibly can. I am also passionate about running and regularly enter marathons both here in Australia & internationally. Without doubt, good food would have to make the list too!

ALSO READ:
Meet a Member: Sonia McDonald of LeadershipHQ
The Brisbane Club

Meet a Member – Sonia McDonald

Sonia McDonald
CEO & Founder, LeadershipHQ

Sonia McDonald - Brisbane Club Member

What is your inspiration in your role?

I’m the CEO and founder of the company LeadershipHQ. I could see that the people I was coaching were getting more confident and capable in their leadership. The difference it made in them and in their team’s organisations and projects was amazing. I think leadership matters.

What prompted you to become a Member?

A few people that work in my space were members. I also knew that the Club provided platforms for events and conferences and because I hold a lot of leadership events, it was appealing as a networking space and a place to call home.
What do you enjoy most about the Club?

It’s a really nice environment to go to events and meet up with people. I love that I have hosted private functions at The Club a lot like Adversity Debates and the Mind Power Her programs and I love bringing a lot of guests to events.

Are you a regular attendee of any Special Interest Groups or what would entice you to join one?

I want to start a leadership special interest group where we can all talk about leadership and the importance of it. Another idea would be a secondhand clothing group, bring in your clothes and have a clothes swap club.

You have just written a book can you tell us about it and why you wrote it?

The book is called ‘Leadership Attitude’ and it’s about how mindset and action can change your world. It is an empowering and practical authentic leadership book about why leadership matters, why confidence matters, why mindset matters . I wrote it because I love writing and I’ve enjoyed it since I was little.

What are any changes you would like to see occurring within the Club?

I would like to see more female members. The female members could partake in a think tank where we work together to get more women to be part of the Club. I’m constantly advocating to make it part of your career strategy. It’s a great way to network. I’m also a great believer in collaboration I think more meeting rooms would be beneficial.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Member: Melanie Farris of New Cavendish Management Consulting

Meet
a
Member

Sonia
McDonald

Sonia McDonald
CEO & Founder, LeadershipHQ

Sonia McDonald - Brisbane Club Member

What is your inspiration in your role?

I’m the CEO and founder of the company LeadershipHQ. I could see that the people I was coaching were getting more confident and capable in their leadership. The difference it made in them and in their team’s organisations and projects was amazing. I think leadership matters.

What prompted you to become a Member?

A few people that work in my space were members. I also knew that the Club provided platforms for events and conferences and because I hold a lot of leadership events, it was appealing as a networking space and a place to call home.
What do you enjoy most about the Club?

It’s a really nice environment to go to events and meet up with people. I love that I have hosted private functions at The Club a lot like Adversity Debates and the Mind Power Her programs and I love bringing a lot of guests to events.

Are you a regular attendee of any Special Interest Groups or what would entice you to join one?

I want to start a leadership special interest group where we can all talk about leadership and the importance of it. Another idea would be a secondhand clothing group, bring in your clothes and have a clothes swap club.

You have just written a book can you tell us about it and why you wrote it?

The book is called ‘Leadership Attitude’ and it’s about how mindset and action can change your world. It is an empowering and practical authentic leadership book about why leadership matters, why confidence matters, why mindset matters . I wrote it because I love writing and I’ve enjoyed it since I was little.

What are any changes you would like to see occurring within the Club?

I would like to see more female members. The female members could partake in a think tank where we work together to get more women to be part of the Club. I’m constantly advocating to make it part of your career strategy. It’s a great way to network. I’m also a great believer in collaboration I think more meeting rooms would be beneficial.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Member: Melanie Farris of New Cavendish Management Consulting
The Brisbane Club

Meet a Member – Melanie Farris

Melanie Farris
Principal, New Cavendish Management Consulting

melanie farris

What prompted you to become a Member?

I was looking to join a members club for both community and connection. A colleague introduced me to the Club, and I was taken by the feel, facilities, specialist groups, and the high frequency of quality events on offer.

What do you enjoy most about the Club?

It is a great environment. The calendar is full of interesting events with great speakers, and I am looking forward to both attending and hosting new and interesting functions. I also look forward to more time enjoying the wonderful food and the excellent Cellar!

Are you a regular attendee of any Special Interest Groups or what would entice you to join one?

As well as arts, music, and maybe (on a good day) marathon-related groups, I recently read about a member keen to start a leadership group which sounds great. I also love photography, and hope to submit an entry to this year’s competition.

What does your business do?

New Cavendish, which is named after the New Cavendish Club, a private members’ club in London created as a meeting place for women who had served with Voluntary Aid Detachments during the First World War, provides company secretary, governance, CFO and investor relations services to SME private and listed companies. Service and commitment to the common good combined with “discretion, firmness and tact” were guiding principles of the New Cavendish Club, which we feel sit very well with our own guiding values.

What does your position entail?

I lead the company secretary, governance and IR services for New Cavendish and its’clients, which range in sector from biotechnology to NFP to agriculture. On a day-to-day basis I work to help align the needs of boards, management and investors, and have also recently led a ‘whole of organisation governance workshop for the Governance Institute of Australia.

What are your passions outside of work?

My precious children lead the list here. Saying that, opportunity and safety for all children is a passion, as is economic and social equity. On a lighter note, music – from classical through to house – has always been a passion, and yoga is a newly found joy.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Member : Anthony Goodwin

Meet
a
Member

Melanie
Farris

Melanie Farris
Principal, New Cavendish Management Consulting

melanie farris

What prompted you to become a Member?

I was looking to join a members club for both community and connection. A colleague introduced me to the Club, and I was taken by the feel, facilities, specialist groups, and the high frequency of quality events on offer.

What do you enjoy most about the Club?

It is a great environment. The calendar is full of interesting events with great speakers, and I am looking forward to both attending and hosting new and interesting functions. I also look forward to more time enjoying the wonderful food and the excellent Cellar!

Are you a regular attendee of any Special Interest Groups or what would entice you to join one?

As well as arts, music, and maybe (on a good day) marathon-related groups, I recently read about a member keen to start a leadership group which sounds great. I also love photography, and hope to submit an entry to this year’s competition.

What does your business do?

New Cavendish, which is named after the New Cavendish Club, a private members’ club in London created as a meeting place for women who had served with Voluntary Aid Detachments during the First World War, provides company secretary, governance, CFO and investor relations services to SME private and listed companies. Service and commitment to the common good combined with “discretion, firmness and tact” were guiding principles of the New Cavendish Club, which we feel sit very well with our own guiding values.

What does your position entail?

I lead the company secretary, governance and IR services for New Cavendish and its’clients, which range in sector from biotechnology to NFP to agriculture. On a day-to-day basis I work to help align the needs of boards, management and investors, and have also recently led a ‘whole of organisation governance workshop for the Governance Institute of Australia.

What are your passions outside of work?

My precious children lead the list here. Saying that, opportunity and safety for all children is a passion, as is economic and social equity. On a lighter note, music – from classical through to house – has always been a passion, and yoga is a newly found joy.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Member : Anthony Goodwin
The Brisbane Club

Meet a Member – Anthony Goodwin

Anthony Goodwin

Anthony Goodwin - Brisbane Club Member

What prompted you to become a Member?

My brother-in-law introduced me to the club in about 1971 and nominated me when I returned to Brisbane in 1983. My major aim then was to use it for marketing purposes, but I soon found that it was also a wonderful haven for a break from the pressures of the day with a sandwich and a bit of quiet reflection at lunch time.

What do you enjoy most about the Club?

The standards it sets and which are happily maintained by my fellow members.

Are you a regular attendee of any Special Interest Groups or what would entice you to join one?

I have recently become a member of Out-of-Towners and The Seniors and have gone to two Photography meetings which I really enjoyed. I was a baritone with the club choir for many years and have only had to give that up because we’ve moved away from Brisbane. However the most significant group for me is the First Thursday Lunch Group, now in its 28th year. I had a small role in setting it up in 1990 with the lion’s share being done by John Tibbits.

The simple criteria he set at that time have proven to be the reason for our success and why so many other similar groups have thrived with his initiative and drive. With seven members still from that very first lunch and all eleven very committed to our ongoing success it is a club within a club that I cherish. That, surely, is the purpose of a Special Interest Group.

What do you enjoy about being a Club Ambassador?

Feeling the freedom to go and talk to anyone at any time and at any function. Of course every member of the club should also feel that freedom but most will be like I am; a bit conservative about interrupting others. But if I could give one message to other members from this experience of being an Ambassador it is that such interruptions are universally welcome and generate the most enjoyable conversations. Getting to know other people has to be one of the main purposes for being a member of a club like ours and just walking up and saying hello is a good way to do it.

What was a memorable event you experienced within the Club?

Denise, my wife and I were married in the Club, with the ceremony taking place on Level 2. It happened to coincide with the 1992 AGM and some delightful, funny and most unexpected things happened. We will never forget it.

What are your passions outside of work?

We have a canal boat in the Netherlands on which we spend 3 months every year. I sing with The Blenders on the Gold Coast. We live in The Ecovillage in Currumbin Valley. I’ve got a workshop and a bike: I have two sons and two step-daughters and a wonderful wife.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Member: Paul Dunn of Exclaim IT & Exclaim Executive

Meet
a
Member

Anthony
Goodwin

Anthony Goodwin

Anthony Goodwin - Brisbane Club Member

What prompted you to become a Member?

My brother-in-law introduced me to the club in about 1971 and nominated me when I returned to Brisbane in 1983. My major aim then was to use it for marketing purposes, but I soon found that it was also a wonderful haven for a break from the pressures of the day with a sandwich and a bit of quiet reflection at lunch time.

What do you enjoy most about the Club?

The standards it sets and which are happily maintained by my fellow members.

Are you a regular attendee of any Special Interest Groups or what would entice you to join one?

I have recently become a member of Out-of-Towners and The Seniors and have gone to two Photography meetings which I really enjoyed. I was a baritone with the club choir for many years and have only had to give that up because we’ve moved away from Brisbane. However the most significant group for me is the First Thursday Lunch Group, now in its 28th year. I had a small role in setting it up in 1990 with the lion’s share being done by John Tibbits.

The simple criteria he set at that time have proven to be the reason for our success and why so many other similar groups have thrived with his initiative and drive. With seven members still from that very first lunch and all eleven very committed to our ongoing success it is a club within a club that I cherish. That, surely, is the purpose of a Special Interest Group.

What do you enjoy about being a Club Ambassador?

Feeling the freedom to go and talk to anyone at any time and at any function. Of course every member of the club should also feel that freedom but most will be like I am; a bit conservative about interrupting others. But if I could give one message to other members from this experience of being an Ambassador it is that such interruptions are universally welcome and generate the most enjoyable conversations. Getting to know other people has to be one of the main purposes for being a member of a club like ours and just walking up and saying hello is a good way to do it.

What was a memorable event you experienced within the Club?

Denise, my wife and I were married in the Club, with the ceremony taking place on Level 2. It happened to coincide with the 1992 AGM and some delightful, funny and most unexpected things happened. We will never forget it.

What are your passions outside of work?

We have a canal boat in the Netherlands on which we spend 3 months every year. I sing with The Blenders on the Gold Coast. We live in The Ecovillage in Currumbin Valley. I’ve got a workshop and a bike: I have two sons and two step-daughters and a wonderful wife.

ALSO READ:
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The Brisbane Club

Meet a Convenor – Bruce Wallis: Golf Group

Bruce Wallis
Golf Group Convenor

Bruce Wallis - Golf group convenor at The Brisbane Club


What are the benefits of being involved in a special interest group and in particular the Golf group at the Brisbane Club?


Our Club Membership is diverse in interests, ages and availability for “outside” functions and companionship. Meeting other members through shared interests provides a great opportunity for other networking and friendships. Golf allows these opportunities in an open environment. Unfortunately, we haven’t translated this into regular golf usage of Club facilities.

What types of events do you hold within your group?


Our golf group continues a fine history of three major events and social golf early in the year. Each year we are challenged by The Downs Club from Toowoomba either on the range or in a Brisbane setting. We play for The Hodge Roberts Trophy, which, when we retain it, is on display in the bar of the Club. Later in the year, we play the Queensland Club for a Trophy which is similarly displayed when we hold it, although unfortunately, it is currently held by them. In November , we play our Championships with Single and Fourball Shields embossed and displayed in the bar.

What numbers do you get coming to your events and how has the group evolved over time?

We have over 200 members identified with the golf group, but timing and diverse availability have restricted our numbers to approximately 17-24 at each event, as golfers seem to live active, roaming lives. We have happily seen the involvement of some Associate members who of course are most welcome to play with us.

What kinds of topics do you discuss regarding Golf and why do believe it is important to have as a special interest group?

Well unlike the Fishing group, we have had the one that got away on the putting green. There is plenty of discussion on any topic at our events.

What do you hope to achieve within special interest groups and encouraging more people to be involved and join one?

The richness of experience within our Membership provides a wonderful opportunity to learn, meet and enjoy the many interests on offer. If your time permits, and your interests are wide, the Club interest groups can deliver real value.

How has your experience been as the Golf Convenor after 4 years in the role?

The ongoing benefit has been meeting some of our different membership in what can be a relaxed environment, and so it has been rewarding and fun. I recommend involvement at any level to any member or associate.

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Meet a Convenor: Theresa Moltoni - Workplace Relations Group

 

Meet
a
Convenor

Bruce
Wallis:
Golf
Group

Bruce Wallis
Golf Group Convenor

Bruce Wallis - Golf group convenor at The Brisbane Club


What are the benefits of being involved in a special interest group and in particular the Golf group at the Brisbane Club?


Our Club Membership is diverse in interests, ages and availability for “outside” functions and companionship. Meeting other members through shared interests provides a great opportunity for other networking and friendships. Golf allows these opportunities in an open environment. Unfortunately, we haven’t translated this into regular golf usage of Club facilities.

What types of events do you hold within your group?


Our golf group continues a fine history of three major events and social golf early in the year. Each year we are challenged by The Downs Club from Toowoomba either on the range or in a Brisbane setting. We play for The Hodge Roberts Trophy, which, when we retain it, is on display in the bar of the Club. Later in the year, we play the Queensland Club for a Trophy which is similarly displayed when we hold it, although unfortunately, it is currently held by them. In November , we play our Championships with Single and Fourball Shields embossed and displayed in the bar.

What numbers do you get coming to your events and how has the group evolved over time?

We have over 200 members identified with the golf group, but timing and diverse availability have restricted our numbers to approximately 17-24 at each event, as golfers seem to live active, roaming lives. We have happily seen the involvement of some Associate members who of course are most welcome to play with us.

What kinds of topics do you discuss regarding Golf and why do believe it is important to have as a special interest group?

Well unlike the Fishing group, we have had the one that got away on the putting green. There is plenty of discussion on any topic at our events.

What do you hope to achieve within special interest groups and encouraging more people to be involved and join one?

The richness of experience within our Membership provides a wonderful opportunity to learn, meet and enjoy the many interests on offer. If your time permits, and your interests are wide, the Club interest groups can deliver real value.

How has your experience been as the Golf Convenor after 4 years in the role?

The ongoing benefit has been meeting some of our different membership in what can be a relaxed environment, and so it has been rewarding and fun. I recommend involvement at any level to any member or associate.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Convenor: Theresa Moltoni - Workplace Relations Group

 
The Brisbane Club

Meet a Convenor – Greg Vickery: Brisbane Club Arts Group

Greg Vickery
Brisbane Club Arts Group Convenor

Greg Vickery1

What are the benefits of being involved in a Special Interest Group and in particular the Arts Group at the Brisbane Club?

It enables you to meet other club members who share a common passion for or interest in the arts and to hear from key people involved in both Visual and Performing Arts in Queensland.

What types of events do you hold within your group?

I have only been in this role since late last year when the name of the group was changed from ‘Fine Arts’ to the more prosaic/more contemporary term, ‘Arts’, which was considered to be more inclusive. I have not had much involvement with the group in the past due to work and Red Cross commitments and I acknowledge the commitment of my predecessors and their committee members, several of whom such as Jonathan and Bruce Blocksidge and Lorelle Pacello continue to support the re-named group.

It is an honour to be the Arts group convenor as it provides a special opportunity for me to spend quality time with members and non-members involved in the Arts in Queensland.

What numbers do you get coming to your events and how has the group evolved over time?

We aim to get at least 20 people to each club luncheon and for our external events but more are welcome. At the Brisbane Club Music Awards dinner last year we attracted 70 people and we hope to do at least as well this year on November 9.

What kinds of topics do you discuss regarding Arts and why do you believe it is important to have as a Special Interest Group?

Our luncheons are focused on the topic chosen by the guest speaker in either the performing or visual arts who are either arts administrators, sponsors of the arts or artists themselves. For example, at our next luncheon on Thursday 23 February we have Patrick Pickett the CEO of the Qld Pops Orchestra as our special guest. After that we have Dr Rob Pensalfini from the Qld Shakespeare Ensemble on March 23, Dr Dimitri Kopenakis from the Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts on May 25, followed by Rachel Crowley from the Brisbane Airport Corporation talking about arts philanthropy on July 28. We have also planned a tour of the Club’s art collection combined with a wine tasting in the late afternoon of July 5.

What do you hope to achieve within Special Interest Groups and encouraging more people to be involved and join one?

It’s a great way to spend time with and to meet new people. It helps break the ice so much more easily if you share a common interest in a particular subject.

We are also looking to organise more activities with other Club interest groups in a common subject area, so that those in the Arts group can meet club members from other groups.
The late afternoon tour of the club’s art collection in July with the wine tasting enables Arts group members to mix with and to get to know better, members of the club’s wine group.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Convenor: Bruce Wallis - Golf Group

Meet
a
Convenor

Greg
Vickery:
Brisbane
Club
Arts
Group

Greg Vickery
Brisbane Club Arts Group Convenor

Greg Vickery1

What are the benefits of being involved in a Special Interest Group and in particular the Arts Group at the Brisbane Club?

It enables you to meet other club members who share a common passion for or interest in the arts and to hear from key people involved in both Visual and Performing Arts in Queensland.

What types of events do you hold within your group?

I have only been in this role since late last year when the name of the group was changed from ‘Fine Arts’ to the more prosaic/more contemporary term, ‘Arts’, which was considered to be more inclusive. I have not had much involvement with the group in the past due to work and Red Cross commitments and I acknowledge the commitment of my predecessors and their committee members, several of whom such as Jonathan and Bruce Blocksidge and Lorelle Pacello continue to support the re-named group.

It is an honour to be the Arts group convenor as it provides a special opportunity for me to spend quality time with members and non-members involved in the Arts in Queensland.

What numbers do you get coming to your events and how has the group evolved over time?

We aim to get at least 20 people to each club luncheon and for our external events but more are welcome. At the Brisbane Club Music Awards dinner last year we attracted 70 people and we hope to do at least as well this year on November 9.

What kinds of topics do you discuss regarding Arts and why do you believe it is important to have as a Special Interest Group?

Our luncheons are focused on the topic chosen by the guest speaker in either the performing or visual arts who are either arts administrators, sponsors of the arts or artists themselves. For example, at our next luncheon on Thursday 23 February we have Patrick Pickett the CEO of the Qld Pops Orchestra as our special guest. After that we have Dr Rob Pensalfini from the Qld Shakespeare Ensemble on March 23, Dr Dimitri Kopenakis from the Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts on May 25, followed by Rachel Crowley from the Brisbane Airport Corporation talking about arts philanthropy on July 28. We have also planned a tour of the Club’s art collection combined with a wine tasting in the late afternoon of July 5.

What do you hope to achieve within Special Interest Groups and encouraging more people to be involved and join one?

It’s a great way to spend time with and to meet new people. It helps break the ice so much more easily if you share a common interest in a particular subject.

We are also looking to organise more activities with other Club interest groups in a common subject area, so that those in the Arts group can meet club members from other groups.
The late afternoon tour of the club’s art collection in July with the wine tasting enables Arts group members to mix with and to get to know better, members of the club’s wine group.

ALSO READ:
Meet a Convenor: Bruce Wallis - Golf Group